Tag Archives: depression relapse

Five signs you are relapsing back into depression.

1. Negative rumination. Negative thoughts that feel like they are on repeat, over and over again.

2. High anxiety.   Feeling like you want to jump out of your skin. Inability to relax.

3. Isolation and withdrawal. Prefer to be alone, avoiding people in general and friends. Failure to return calls from friends and family.

4. Sleep issues. Unable to get out of bed. Sleeping too much or too little.

3. Poor hygiene.   Not showering, brushing teeth, combing hair or wearing clean clothes.

4. Tearful. No particular reason for crying. Feeling low.

5. Poor concentration.  Inability to concentrate on the simplest of tasks.

6. Poor short term memory. This goes hand-in-hand with poor concentration.

These are known as active symptoms and usually indicate that the medication is not being taken as prescribed or that the medication needs to be adjusted or changed. Alcohol or drug use may also render the medication ineffective. Contact your doctor immediately.

Zoom!

Now I can work via zoom with anyone, anywhere in the country and it may still be covered by BCBS Insurance.  Check with your BCBS representative for more information. Call James E. DelGenio MS, LCPC, Senior Staff Therapist at The Family Institute at Northwestern University, 847-733-4300 Ext 638.

http://manageyourmood.net
http://family-institute.org
http://psychologytoday.com
http://takenotelessons.com Highly effective online, one on one, SAT, ACT, GRE, standardized test preparation, via face time or skype.

Disclaimer: This material is meant to be used in conjunction with psychiatric treatment, medication, if necessary, and supportive therapy.  Always share this material and your questions about this material with your doctor and therapist.

What causes relapse to depression?

James E. DelGenio MS, Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor

Relapse Warning Signs and Symptoms of Depression.
It is extremely important to be aware of relapse warning signs and symptoms. When one is taking medication as prescribed by the doctor, symptoms are largely under control and the client is stable. The reappearance of certain symptoms is an indication that the medication may need to be adjusted, reevaluated or changed. These symptoms may also be an indication that the medication is no longer being taken as prescribed or alcohol and substance use is interfering with the effectiveness of the medication.
These symptoms include:
• Thoughts about hurting oneself or others.
• Changes in one’s sleep/wake cycle, especially little or no sleep.
• Inability to concentrate, rapid speech, skidding from subject to subject.
• Rapid mood fluctuations, negative thoughts on repeat.
• Poor judgment, risky behavior, or lack of insight into one’s own behavior
These symptoms are reflected by poor daily functioning, lack of motivation, loss of interest and conflict. These are considered to be active symptoms and usually are caused by non-compliance with medication and use of alcohol or drugs. In many instances, the medication may need to be changed or the dosage adjusted by the doctor. This may also reflect the need for family members to monitor medication compliance and alcohol/drug usage. Relapse warning signs should be reported to the doctor and therapist immediately. Don’t wait!
Not in the Chicago Area! Zoom! Now I can work via zoom with anyone, anywhere in the country and it may still be covered by BCBS Insurance. Check with your BCBS representative.
For those in the metropolitan Chicago area, I have offices in Millennium Park on Michigan Avenue, and near 22nd St and Wolf Road in Westchester. Call James E. DelGenio MS, LCPC, Senior Staff Therapist at The Family Institute at Northwestern University, 847-733-4300 Ext 638.
http://manageyourmood.net
http://family-institute.org
http://psychologytoday.com
http://takenotelessons.com  Effective on-line, one on one, SAT, ACT, GRE, standardized test preparation, via face time, zoom or skype.
Disclaimer: This material is meant to be used in conjunction with psychiatric treatment, medication, if necessary, and supportive therapy. Always share this material and your questions about this material with your doctor and therapist.